Monday, February 11, 2013

Our Bodies Store Emotions

Here’s something interesting to think about. I’ve taught about the body-soul-spirit connection for some time, and today I had an experience that brought the importance of this need for awareness to me once again. Let me start by asking you to imagine you accidently hit your head on the door frame of your car and you experience a stabbing, searing pain. What you do about it is as important as the blow itself  because if you snarl, frown, cry, curse or get mad your body stores not only the blow on the head but your reaction.  Naturally, your soul is affected too, (your intellect, emotions, will) but at the time of sudden pain all your reasoning power shuts down.  When you feel sudden physical pain your response is strictly emotional. (Just note what your fists and toes do at the dentist when the Novocain needle hits your sensitive gum.)

Our bodies store not only the memory of the prick of the Novocain needle or the blow on the head, but they store our accompanying emotions. The body remembers and the soul remembers.

The body stores trauma, both physical and emotional. 

You probably guessed that I’m the one who hit my head on the door frame of my car today. I sat in the front seat doubled over waiting for the pain to subside with thoughts twirling. “Why did this happen?” “Why wasn’t I more careful?” “Will I have a lump?” “Oh Jesus, take the pain away.” And because of my teeth-gritting emotional state I didn’t think to say a sweet, comforting blessing to my head.  

Later I reminded myself that my body requires resolution just as my mind does. I put my hands on my head and said a blessing over it in the name of Jesus.

What I want stored in my body is not the trauma of life with its accidents, trials, abuse, sorrows and blows, but the blessing of God.  I’m going to talk more about the total person in this new weekly blog. Next time let’s look more at how our emotions  get stored not only in our inner emotional bank, but our bodies.

Meanwhile, I hope you’ll read my two new books published in 2012, THE OTHER SIDE OF SUFFERING (John Ramsey’s incredible story) and THE EMANCIPATION OF ROBERT SADLER (you’ll never forget this story—how I loved this man.)

And I love you too –

1 comment:

  1. This is so interesting! I fell on the the ice a couple months ago. It resulted in only strained tendons and muscles in my knees.
    However due to the nature of how hard I fell and what my eyes had witnessed.
    I thought it was worse and reacted so strongly emotionally.
    I realized after sometime my body's movements seemed to be locked into trauma. More than the actual physical limitations that were presenting themselves.
    This was a wonderful blog and confirmation!
    Keri from Chicago